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nitoriaiichirou:

yeah but, cartoon women, any drawn women, aren’t wearing those skimpy and sexual clothes out of choice, they’re wearing it because someone drew them that way, normally for a reason. so so don’t go “oh maybe she chooses to fight crime in a bikini and high heels” bc a man sat at a desk and decided she was gunna wear those clothes, for a reason, for the audience or his gaze. so no, its not slut shaming, its creepy man shaming

(via womenorgnow)

Happy 55th Birthday, Emma Thompson ! (April 15th, 1959)

❝ I try hard not to be preoccupied by how I look. I don’t think I am considered a beauty in that sense, I always thought of myself as a character actress, so in a sense I’ve got much less to lose.❞

(via womenorgnow)

A lot of characters are called strong female protagonists when it’s kind of a cipher, and it doesn’t mean what it should mean. Like, a female character will be called a strong female protagonist for crying only a handful of times as opposed to the entire story, when Indiana Jones is not called a strong male protagonist for bullwhipping Nazis and shooting guns at ghosts and stuff. So [our webcomic Strong Female Protagonist] started as an exercise in making a character strong in every sense of the word that we could find, where she’s strong in a literary sense — or so we hope — strong in the sense of conviction and heroism and morality, and then physically, superhumanly strong.

shortformblog:

This is what the diversity breakdown of best director nominees for the Oscars looks like. This year provides a big opportunity for a breakthrough, as Buzzfeed’s Adam B. Vary explains:

At this year’s Academy Awards, Alfonso Cuarón could be the first Latino man to win the Oscar for Best Director (for the sci-fi film Gravity) — and given that he’s won the Directors Guild of America award, he is by far the odds-on favorite to win. If he doesn’t, however, the man who has a strong chance of scoring an upset is12 Years a Slave’s director Steve McQueen — who would be the first black man to win in this category.

And this would be a very big deal: More than perhaps any other people in the world, film directors have had the greatest first-hand influence on how we see ourselves for over a century, as they’ve steered tens of thousands of film productions big and small, driving and defining one of (if not the) most influential representation of our culture for just about 100 years.

But when one looks at the nominees and winners for the Academy Award for Best Director — the best barometer we have for whom the film industry regards as the finest film directors of their respective years — an overwhelming majority of them have been white men.

By the way, that sliver of the pie shown that makes up people who aren’t white and male represents just 17 people.

(via lipstick-feminists)

moriarty:

saunterdown:

baruchsbalthamos:

littleblueartist:

never not reblog Scarlett calling idiots out on their bullshit

image

and the shitty part is that once scarlett called them out on their fucking bullshit, she automatically became coined a bitch. a bitch. for being brave enough to publicly tell them what was so annoying about a still continuing problem for women in media

"You work hard making independent films for fourteen years and you get voted best breasts.” - scarlett johansson

god i feel horrible for her. i feel horrible for every single woman in this world. and it was to the point where she decided to get breast reduction surgery for her to be taken more seriously as an actress. what the hell is wrong with everybody

and i never, ever understood the hate towards anne hathaway. new york times magazine stated “Anne Hathaway practically demands that we love her.” fucking wrong. anne never gave a shit about looking stuck up when she was out there on stage, preaching for gay rights and how wrong it is for men to constantly sexualize and put down women in the media in every single interview where a man asked the bullshit question “what diet plan did you use for your role in les mis, i bet every single girl wants to know”. she knew a backlash would come from for being so strong and forceful with her retortive statements, but they saved the people that mattered.

and another point. kristen stewart. why in the hell do people hate kristen stewart as a person. women today are expected to act pretty. nice. be respectful 24/7, never argue back, smile pretty, be a lady. don’t make rash, argumentative statements, because if you do, you are not a lady. this is a message our society tries to suffocate women with. kristen stewart will not smile for you, or act like a fuckin lady for you, because that is not her character

yet people hate her because she decides to be herself. “god kristen, you gotta smile some more, talk more ladylike”

what in the fuck for? absolutely nobody knows kristen stewart’s personality. she’s a private person. but just because she refuses to lie through her teeth to seem like a respectable, golden lady of hollywood, she’s considered a bitch. “do this or that because if you don’t you aint a lady” god fuckin damn all of you

all the wrong actresses are getting the hate. you know what really pisses me off are the actresses that just drift on by, answering all an interviewer’s fuckin condescending questions because they’re too afraid to say anything else. just walk nice, smile and say all of those stupid, feminine things you can say in order to get the most fans. at least that’s what their publicists are making them do

its really early in the morning and i cant think straight so if my rant seems messy im sorry

 

(via puzzlestuecke)

mckelvie:

popculturebrain:

Leading Men Age, Leading Women Don’t | Vulture

There are more charts if you click through.

It took me a long time to realise why the male age line isn’t straight, but it’s because the years along the bottom axis aren’t equally spaced. Good visualisation of a depressing point, otherwise.

(via jaiwren)

Except you can’t show a topless woman on TV - and you can’t defibrillate a woman in a bra. So victims of heart attacks on TV are always male. Did you know that a woman having a heart attack is more likely to have back or jaw pain than chest or left arm pain? I didn’t - because I’ve never seen a woman having a heart attack. I’ve been trained in CPR and Advanced First Aid by the Red Cross over 15 times in my life, the videos and booklets always have a guy and say the same thing about clutching his chest and/or bicep.

And people laugh when I tell them women are still invisible in this world.

distractedbyshinyobjects

re: feministing - for women, heart attacks look different

Things I did not know, but should.

(via elfgrove)

This is a post that might save a life. 

(via str8nochaser)

My mom worked for 25 years as an ER nurse and is convinced that a lot of women die simply because folks only know heart attack symptoms that occur in males. 

(via darkjez)WHT

(via scarfarms)

a very real example of why representation matters/how media can affect our perspective on many things

(via feministdisney)

Lowonliches said: And this still doesn’t answer how a heart attack plays out in (all) people who are not cis/dyadic.

(via lowoncliches)

(via lowoncliches)

nitratediva:

This is a film studio in Paris. The year is 1905. Can you spot the director?
I’ll give you a hint. She’s wearing a corset. 
The woman silhouetted in the center foreground is Alice Guy, the world’s first female filmmaker and head of production at Gaumont. Unfortunately, we can’t hear what she’s saying to the cast and crew, but if you watch this entire clip, you will see her arranging actors and turning on music to help them dance in time.

nitratediva:

This is a film studio in Paris. The year is 1905. Can you spot the director?

I’ll give you a hint. She’s wearing a corset. 

The woman silhouetted in the center foreground is Alice Guy, the world’s first female filmmaker and head of production at Gaumont. Unfortunately, we can’t hear what she’s saying to the cast and crew, but if you watch this entire clip, you will see her arranging actors and turning on music to help them dance in time.

(via whataloadofcrock)

bitch-media:

These three charts show who makes our media. An interesting new report from the Women’s Media Center shows the gender disparity in who writes our news. Read the full report here

After many years working in the film industry, I am struggling in to find work. It’s hard for me to admit when I need help, and even harder to ask for it. I got into film so I could tell stories about the world from a woman’s voice. It’s in my nature to care about social issues and the environment. I’ve won awards as a director, worked as an editor and done various jobs for producers and post facilities.

It’s true that working in Hollywood is tough and competitive for everyone. I’ve made my own mistakes, but I believe the biggest impediment has been the industry’s rampant sexism. I’m not alone either. A panel of women directors at this year’s Sundance discussed how they were routinely judged as not competent enough to be in charge of technical things, no matter how great their experience. The issue is getting more attention.